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Organic is not good

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Organic is not good enough! (I hope that leaving that last word off the title caught your attention.)

Organic food is becoming very popular. This is the fastest growing segment of the grocery business. I consider that a good sign. However, with this success there are some problems. The demand for organic foods has created a supply problem. Food producers and retailers cannot get enough organic products. What I have noticed, as a result of that, is a great reduction in quality. For example, when I try to purchase organic carrots, I often find that they are older and of poorer quality than the non-organic carrots now. In years past, the opposite was true.

We need good quality organic foods. Simply bringing poor quality foods to market with organic certification is not good enough. After all, those of us buying organic foods have proven that we are willing to pay a premium for quality.

However, there is a larger point to this article. Even if the quality is good, being organic is not enough.

The Game of Eating – Part Three

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Introduction

In part one of this series, I stated that our health is directly correlated with our knowledge of good nutrition and good lifestyle choices. There is a very simple and very powerful relationship: the better one’s knowledge of health, the healthier one can be.

 

In part two of this three part series, I discussed one option for being healthy without acquiring specific nutritional knowledge. It’s the only option I can think of -- and it is rarely available, as I explained.

In this final article of the series I will further emphasize why we must be knowledgeable about what we eat.

The Game of Eating

There is a relationship – an interaction – between food producers and us, as food consumers. This interaction is the game of eating (and it includes grocery shopping, of course).

 

The Game of Eating – Part Two

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Introduction

In part one of this series, I stated that our health is directly correlated with our knowledge of good nutrition and good lifestyle choices. There is a very simple and very powerful relationship: the better one’s knowledge of health, the healthier one can be.

 

In this article, which is part two of a three part series, I will discuss what it would take to enjoy robust health without acquiring any specific nutritional knowledge.

In part three, I will give my view on how the sophisticated knowledge of today’s food producers (even producers of natural and organic foods) demands that we elevate our game – and if we fail to do so, we could pay the price with our health.

The Game of Eating - Part One

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This is a three-part series. All three articles are tied together by the theme of knowledge equals health. Part one states the case for the tremendous impact we can have on our health by gaining knowledge.

Part two examines the theme from another angle. I examine whether there is an alternative to acquiring specific knowledge about nutrition. Can we just apply common sense and intuition?

Stiff asks, great programmers answer

Stiff asks, great programmers answer

10 questions and answers for each of these great programmers:

Linus Torvalds - The Linux kernel author

Floyd Landis already looks like a Tour de France winner

Floyd looked fantastic climbing Alpe d’Huez today. He looked like he had more in reserve than any of the other GC contenders.

OK, so the Tour de France isn't really motorcycle racing, but it does get in the way of the Motocross broadcasts on OLN TV, so I figure I can squeeze it in here too.